The Coinage and Ideas of Rulership

The Coinage and Ideas of Rulership

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Introduction

The massive support of the image was to ensure that the power and rulership were being honored through the entire framework of leaders. Most of the scholars and philosophers maintain that the coinage symbol stands out among the other material evidence of the reign such as sword and building that have been left by some of the past leaders. Therefore, it was the culture of these people to place the coinage as an evidence of power and leadership (Puccio, Gerard, Marie Mance, and Mary, 2010).

 According to scholars, it has been noted that the design of the portrait reflects that of the Byzantine practice but that of the ancient traditions. The Roman coins have the connotation with a reflection on the image that is intended for power. The community of Carolingian did not just imitate the Romans ways of the coinage but also employed the Germanic culture that is based on the leadership style. It was also used in the minting of the traditional religious aspect that has

Successive images that cannot be forgotten throughout the entire generation.  The design has reached through a factual representation of the kings who have passed their facts to the society. The imitation process has always intended the power of the ruler understanding the various cultures and traditions of the community of rulership. The enhanced quality then wills dictates the coinage process through essentiality (Davis, 2014).

The coinage system has expressed various groups of the franks through the tradition that is passed from generation to another. The articles still seek to find out the idea of the appearance of the striking, innovative use of the coinage system that is being implemented through the entire community. The scholars regard the coinage as a reaction that is passed through an order from the Romans to the society that is outside Rome (Rule, Nicholas and Nalini Ambady, 2008). The average survival of the coins leaves the community and the scholars with a historical congruence that happens between recognition and the reign of Charlemagne.

Conclusions

The coinage portrait in the community is used to represent and indicate the level of power of the leadership. However, despite the indication of th[1]e trait of power, the imaging technology has been borrowed through the Romans and the Germanics. Therefore, the issue of coinage and the reasons as to why only one individual should have that authority to appear in the coins is represented through the power and strong leadership. The facts are read to indicate the value of understanding who to rule the nations.

Bibliographies

Davis, Jennifer R. “Charlemagne’s portrait coinage and ideas of rulership at the Carolingian court.” Source: Notes in the History of Art 33, no. 3/4 (2014): 19-27.

Goodman, Martin. “Coinage and Identity: The Jewish Evidence.” Coinage and Identity in the Roman Provinces (2005): 163-166.

Lambert, L. I. N. D. A. “Shifting conceptions of leadership: Towards a redefinition of leadership for the twenty-first century.” Handbook of educational leadership and management (2003): 5-15.

Mayer, Richard E. “Should there be a three-strikes rule against pure discovery learning?.” American psychologist 59, no. 1 (2004): 14.

Puccio, Gerard J., Marie Mance, and Mary C. Murdock. Creative leadership: Skills that drive change. Sage Publications, 2010.

Rule, Nicholas O., and Nalini Ambady. “The face of success: Inferences from chief executive officers’ appearance predict company profits.” Psychological science 19, no. 2 (2008): 109-111.


[1] Davis, Jennifer R. “Charlemagne’s portrait coinage and ideas of rulership at the Carolingian court.” Source: Notes in the History of Art 33, no. 3/4 (2014): 19-27.

Goodman, Martin. “Coinage and Identity: The Jewish Evidence.” Coinage and Identity in the Roman Provinces (2005): 163-166.

Lambert, L. I. N. D. A. “Shifting conceptions of leadership: Towards a redefinition of leadership for the twenty-first century.” Handbook of educational leadership and management (2003): 5-15.