What causes cystic fibrosis?

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Cystic fibrosis

What causes cystic fibrosis?

To get the condition the patient has to inherit a mutated copy of the gene structure from both parents (Smith & Eric E. et al). Therefore, this shows that if the patient inherits from one parent, he or she will not have the condition but will only be a carrier and hence a high chance of transmitting it to the next generation. According to research, about 10 million children in the United States have the condition. Moreover, there is a 25% chance of a child whose parents are both carriers to get the condition.

According to alternative healing modalities such as lying of hand and magnetic approach, all the disease are believed to be a curse from the God or invoked by the devil. Therefore, based on mental or physic healing, there is a room explanation on the fact that cystic fibrosis is genetic and is hereditary due to the backing of the medical research in science. An alternative healing perspective is a cultural tool brought about by various beliefs that the source of all evil is from the devil. For example, a Christian family will apply the use of prayer when such condition exists even when medication would be involved. Consequently, according to cystic foundation group in Facebook, cystic fibrosis is a condition that is caused by a disorder in a gene that is responsible for the formation of fluids within the cells in the body. Therefore, it is a hereditary condition that is passed from parents to the child especially when both the parents are carriers of the gene disorder.

Treatment

 Based on mainstream medical, the treatment of the cystic fibrosis includes the physical therapy that is performed to loosen the mucus in the lungs and also the use of pancreatic enzymes and various medications to fight dangerous infections in the lungs. According to HealthDay news on Sunday may 2015 on ‘’ combo treatment for cystic fibrosis shows promise’’ involves combining two medication that seeks to target the most severe genetic course of cystic fibrosis to improve the functional ability of lungs in people with the condition. The combination technique therapy reduced the rate of infections and other problems occurring within the lungs. The two drugs used for medication are known as invocator and lumacaftor which are already approved by the U.S Food and drugs administrations for treating certain individuals with cystic fibrosis according to researchers (Solez and Sheila).

According to cystic fibrosis foundation in Facebook gives clinical trial results were announced based on the late-stage study of lumacaftor and invocator in the children ages from 2-5 who have two copies. The study indicated that the two drugs are safe for use and can be being tolerated with the present age groups. Therefore, based on the information Vertex is expected produce a new drug application to the United States food and drug administration in the year 2008. Moreover, according to alternative healing modalities, the cultural aspects of some communities especially those that are grounded in the roots of religion have a different view of the treatment of cystic fibrosis or any other disorder that exists in the society. Moreover, the modalities include the aspect of naturopathy or the osteopathy which are non-biotech medical system that tends to understand the body as a living, dynamic system composed of various interconnected systems (Tsao, Jennie, and Lonnie). In the states, the osteopathy goes to school just like any other medical doctors though he or she applies the issue of theory on the treatment of cystic fibrosis and other conditions. They focus more on the natural treatment sessions, and this involves the use of herbs like the goldenseal or the red Reishi mushroom for treatment.

Moreover, some alternative modalities for the treatment of Cystic fibrosis involve the use of massage. This is one of the known and recommended ways for treating some of the conditions in the body. Since cystic fibrosis leads to the congestion within the lung especially in the diaphragm section, a massage therapy within the locked areas causing difficulty in breathing would be cleared in a couple of weeks. The massage therapy is believed to loosen up the tight muscles within the chest around the rib-cage, the diaphragm and the entire back system hence assists in expanding the lungs, getting more of the oxygen and moving out the mucus from the lung areas and other stubborn parts. Consequently, there are other systems such as the laying of hands to pray for the patient who has the condition based on the doctrine that Jesus heals. These have been a rescue point for some of the patient who has the condition (Solez and Sheila).

Conclusion

Cystic fibrosis is one of the deadly conditions that are based on gene mutation and hereditary factors. According to research every year 1000 new victims are diagnosed with the condition. However, there has been the various understanding platform for the condition based on cultural factors and objectives. There are some cultures like the Traditional beliefs where the cause of the condition is based on religious background or the issue of mindset. On the other hand, some have also embraced the role of science in the determination of the causal factor of the condition.

Work cited

LeGrys, Vicky A., et al. “Diagnostic sweat testing: the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation guidelines.” The Journal of Pediatrics 151.1 (2007): 85-89.

Smith, Eric E., et al. “Genetic adaptation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the airways of cystic fibrosis patients.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 103.22 (2006): 8487-8492.

Solez, Kim, and Sheila Moriber Katz. “Cybermedicine: Mainstream Medicine By 2020/Crossing Boundaries, 19 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 557 (2001).” The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law 19.4 (2001): 2.

Tsao, Jennie CI, and Lonnie K. Zeltzer. “Complementary and alternative medicine approaches for pediatric pain: a review of the state-of-the-science.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2.2 (2005): 149-159.